Graduating? Good luck, kid.

Please share this article:
Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

Laura LaVacca
Campus News. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What am I going to do? How will I get a job? Are there even any jobs available? If these thoughts are running through your head, you aren’t alone. Given the 2007 economic downturn, the usual job hunt has become more difficult and harder than ever before. The U.S. unemployment rate increased to 10.2% by October 2009 and the average hours per work week declined to 33, the lowest level since the government began collecting data in 1964 (http://data.bls.gov ). Currently, the employment rate is 9.7% with many companies and businesses still laying off people and cutting budgets. The job market is practically nonexistent.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
What does this mean for recent graduates and those approaching graduation? In New York alone, approximately 1.2 million people are enrolled in colleges and universities; this number does not even include those in graduate programs or professional schools (http://factfinder.census.gov). Consequently, students are feeling the stress of the job hunt, as prospects narrow and making ends meet has become the new trend.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Peter Apazogloue, 19, anstudent at Rutgers University, expressed similar anxieties, “As a broadcast journalism major, I definitely want to pursue a career in broadcasting, but I am nervous about the market once I get out of school. In my line of work, you need to know people to get to the top and having the economy like it is doesn’t help me much!”
If finding a job wasn’t difficult enough, Apazolgloue points out another unfortunate occurrence in the job world — the need for one to have connections. Even the most qualified people oftentimes do not get the job because they don’t “know somebody.” This is often the case in the education world, where educators prefer a candidate they know and can validate as a person worthy of working with children.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
“Personally, I think my knowing someone in the education field got me an interview. It’s horrible to say, but it’s true,” an anonymous graduate student, 24, at Hofstra University, stated.  Michael Anthony, an elementary school teacher and recent graduate of Adelphi University, also weighed in, “I see people in my building who are only here because they have connections — it’s a shame that connections oftentimes comes before a qualified candidate.”
Education is a popular job market in New York, where teachers salaries begin in the high $40,000s and can go upward of $100,000. Lisa Calder, 20, a student at Hofstra University, enrolled in the Psychology program hoping to become a school psychologist.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
She stated, “I worry about getting a job because there really aren’t many out there for school psychologists. My mom works at a school, and she tells me how there are never any openings for any job position at her school and that definitely scares me.”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Marissa LoMonaco, 18, undeclared, also weighed in explaining that she “knows the situation is really bad” because one of her friends “is graduating this year from Cortland with a degree in education and the school near her laid off 100 teachers. My high school only laid off five, but I heard Island trees District laid off about 62.”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Education is certainly not the only competitive field now daunted by the after effects of the economic crisis, but they are affecting every career field. Specifically, creative fields like writing and the arts, which are already near impossible to enter, are beginning to crush even the slightest glimmer of hope these students have. Joseph Chilman, 26, a graduate student at Hofstra University, explains, “I worry a lot about getting a job. I know the field I’m headed into is very competitive and job placements are rare…being a novelist, I worry I’m going into an area where the odds of finding an opportunity are low…the future seems unclear.”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
In preparation for the disappointment, some students are bracing.  Jennifer A., 23, an aspiring writer and student at the University of Scranton, explained that she is “creating fall-back opportunities for herself” so that if her first, most desired job falls through, “she has other jobs to provide for herself.”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
It seems students are not only preparing for one job prospect but must be open to many — even if it isn’t what they want. Lauren K., 21, a Hospitality Management major at NYIT, stated that she was “worried about not getting a job after graduation” and was “conscious to choose a field that opened her up” to many different job opportunities — whether she wanted them or not. For the new graduate, the job world has shrunk and having a plan A is no longer sufficient, as one needs a Plan B and C.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Given the extenuating circumstances, the once positive feelings of accomplishment and excitement that came with a college degree are now tainted with anxiety and uncertainty. Jacob Gallay, 24, an alum of Catholic University of America summed up what many are feeling: “The hunt for a job is always at the forefront of my mind.”

We'd like it if you'd connect with us:
Facebooktwitterlinkedinrssyoutubemail

Please share this article:
Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

About Campus News 581 Articles
Contact us to write for us or to advertise!

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*